Welcome to my multi-fandom blog.
I hope you enjoy your stay.
thedandyunderworld:

Probably one of the best costumes from the con that I’ve seen.

thedandyunderworld:

Probably one of the best costumes from the con that I’ve seen.

4 hours ago with 70,106 notes — via karlimeaghan, © thedandyunderworld


thatisludicrous:

castiels-celestiel-dick:

vinegod:

Some people say I look like this guy by MrLegenDarius

jfc

OH MY GOD YES

4 hours ago with 159,067 notes — via kawaii-suki, © vinegod


4 hours ago with 322,171 notes — via oswaldz, © sizvideos


carbonbasedfangirl:

fuzzykitty01:

davusignavus:

rudimentree:

davusignavus:

i liked the page for my school’s lgbt* center on facebook and my mom just sent me a message that said

image

“now all of china knows you’re queer”

please deliver this reply to your mother:

image“perfect”
image

she laughed so hard i think she exploded

It’s back and still beautiful!

oh my god

4 hours ago with 203,317 notes — via allmyfandomtears, © davusignavus


victoniac:

victoniac:

casteilnovak:

watchtheskytonight:

flaaffytaaffy:

my brothers say that if this gets 500,000 notes i get to get out of the cage

image

goddammit we’re getting you out of hell ourselves 

if we get enough notes we need to take a screen shot and tweet it to the writers.

yessss

Even if you arent a supernatutal fan, favourite and reblog this for us.

5 hours ago with 414,075 notes — via twerking-balthazar, © shotastiel




busket:

i just realized that the crunchyroll logo is an anime eye

image

5 hours ago with 19,212 notes — via yellowfangofstarclan, © busket


marsbert:

icy-mischief:

l-o-k-i-hiddleston:

frostironscribe:

Lessons in Great Acting by Tom Hiddleston

where the [heck] is his academy award already.

//Yeah remember that one time when Frigga gave her younger son the throne legitimately in a deleted scene that was removed to up his seeming sneak factor but that adds new meaning to him calling himself the RIGHTFUL king of Asgard in Avengers Assemble?

Yeah nobody does. And that was sadly the aim. 

omg the face…..especially in the third gif….so close to the face in the “tell me” scene…..omg this is crushing me……AHHH!

5 hours ago with 26,995 notes — via haejinoonar, © thorlokid


5 hours ago with 22,354 notes — via i-am-soul-here-me-roar, © pleatedjeans


achievementt-teeth:

A collection of Ray’s beautiful selfies



midstorm:

How to Train Your Dragon + Popular Tumblr Post

5 hours ago with 3,534 notes — via supermegafoxyawesomehotnot, © midstorm


beautifulhetalia:

無題 by 猫饅頭
Permission to repost given by artist.

beautifulhetalia:

無題 by 猫饅頭

Permission to repost given by artist.
6 hours ago with 338 notes — via mosoli, © beautifulhetalia


mmanalysis:

chirart:

NO GIRLS ALLOWED: Unraveling the story behind the stereotype of video games being for boys. 

But the process of breaking down the widely held stereotype of games being for boys doesn’t end with game-makers targeting diverse audiences, Bogost says. In fact, he doesn’t believe that is the right approach, in the same way he doesn’t believe that the industry going after the male audience was a smart idea. “It seems to me an enormously stupid idea, actually,” Bogost says. “All you have to do is look at the most successful games to see that it’s only been possible for them to be massively successful if they don’t systematically exclude half the population.”
In order for video games to overcome their existing stereotype, they have to be sold to us as general purpose products. Bogost uses bookstores as an example. No one is surprised when they go into a bookstore and find that there are books for children, books about gardening or books about cooking. It’s accepted that books are a general purpose medium that can address lots of interests. The same applies to television — it doesn’t surprise people that there are channels dedicated to cooking, sports, animals or news. Bogost says that games are already there in terms of there being a diverse variety that can do different things — it just hasn’t effectively gotten the message out there yet.
When the message gets out there — when video games are seen as a general purpose medium, and a person who plays Angry Birds can associate that with playing games on a PlayStation 4 — then perhaps the stereotype will begin to fade. It would be a big marketing challenge, but it’s not impossible.
"Given enough money, I could make guys buy tampons," says Roeser. “I mean, I could figure out something to do with them. It all comes down to how somebody like me, and there’s frighteningly thousands of me across the country and the world, creates a campaign that specifically targets an audience.” Roeser believes that if the makers of Call of Duty came to him and said they wanted to pursue the female market, it could be done. It would just be a matter of making the message appealing to women and reaching them through the right channels.
[…]
"The way we relate to consumer products through marketing is real," Bogost says. "In this industry, we think of marketers as these evil-doers who take the product and ruin it by hocking it in the wrong way to the public. And that might be true. I don’t know. But advertising is enormously powerful.”

I really enjoyed this article from Polygon, which talks about the history of marketing and the female relationship to video game advertizing and perception. Also, suspecting that hell froze over, I was also pleased by the calm, thoughtful discussion in the comments.

Seriously, this is worth a read. 
Interestingly enough, I think this is why, for me, I’ve always been played on Nintendo systems and wasn’t interested in Playstation or X-Box. Nintendo has and continues to market itself as the console for everyone and from a marketing point ti should be. Console should be treated like a DVD player in that you buy it to play the genres you want to play on it.

mmanalysis:

chirart:

NO GIRLS ALLOWED: Unraveling the story behind the stereotype of video games being for boys. 

But the process of breaking down the widely held stereotype of games being for boys doesn’t end with game-makers targeting diverse audiences, Bogost says. In fact, he doesn’t believe that is the right approach, in the same way he doesn’t believe that the industry going after the male audience was a smart idea. “It seems to me an enormously stupid idea, actually,” Bogost says. “All you have to do is look at the most successful games to see that it’s only been possible for them to be massively successful if they don’t systematically exclude half the population.

In order for video games to overcome their existing stereotype, they have to be sold to us as general purpose products. Bogost uses bookstores as an example. No one is surprised when they go into a bookstore and find that there are books for children, books about gardening or books about cooking. It’s accepted that books are a general purpose medium that can address lots of interests. The same applies to television — it doesn’t surprise people that there are channels dedicated to cooking, sports, animals or news. Bogost says that games are already there in terms of there being a diverse variety that can do different things — it just hasn’t effectively gotten the message out there yet.

When the message gets out there — when video games are seen as a general purpose medium, and a person who plays Angry Birds can associate that with playing games on a PlayStation 4 — then perhaps the stereotype will begin to fade. It would be a big marketing challenge, but it’s not impossible.

"Given enough money, I could make guys buy tampons," says Roeser. “I mean, I could figure out something to do with them. It all comes down to how somebody like me, and there’s frighteningly thousands of me across the country and the world, creates a campaign that specifically targets an audience.” Roeser believes that if the makers of Call of Duty came to him and said they wanted to pursue the female market, it could be done. It would just be a matter of making the message appealing to women and reaching them through the right channels.

[…]

"The way we relate to consumer products through marketing is real," Bogost says. "In this industry, we think of marketers as these evil-doers who take the product and ruin it by hocking it in the wrong way to the public. And that might be true. I don’t know. But advertising is enormously powerful.



I really enjoyed this article from Polygon, which talks about the history of marketing and the female relationship to video game advertizing and perception. Also, suspecting that hell froze over, I was also pleased by the calm, thoughtful discussion in the comments.

Seriously, this is worth a read. 

Interestingly enough, I think this is why, for me, I’ve always been played on Nintendo systems and wasn’t interested in Playstation or X-Box. Nintendo has and continues to market itself as the console for everyone and from a marketing point ti should be. Console should be treated like a DVD player in that you buy it to play the genres you want to play on it.

6 hours ago with 1,853 notes — via burstrondocg, © polygon.com


asthewheelwills:

crazyworldgirl:

pansexualpagan:

silentdimension:

The name’s Mickey. Mickey Smith. Defending the earth.

And that’s what I call character development.

But why did they have to turn Martha into the scared one to do it though. They could’ve just been like ‘fuck yeah let’s do this together’

Sorry… I don’t normally do this, but this scene actually matters a lot to me. It’s my second favourite of the goodbyes in that episode (the first being Rose).

This moment isn’t about fear.  While the evil alien was still shooting at them, Martha never showed any fear (neither did Mickey, for that matter).  She was thrilled, laughing, and having a fantastic time.

The moment that is giffed on the right above is after the Sontaran has been dispatched and Martha and Mickey are seeing the Doctor and recognizing that he’s saying goodbye.  It’s not about fear, not of dying, but fear and upset on behalf of the Doctor, and Mickey isn’t protecting her, he’s comforting her.

This gifset, to me, isn’t about Mickey becoming brave, even though he did. It’s about Mickey becoming an adult.  On the left, he is a submissive member of the relationship, seeking comfort when he’s afraid.  In the second, he’s an equal member of the relationship, offering comfort when he and his partner are upset.  Because that’s what adults should do.

In addition, Martha turns to Mickey not simply, to my mind, to seek comfort, but also because she knows that he will need comfort as well.  Because the Doctor means a lot to both of them.



jcatgrl:

copperbadge:

persinetteinthetower:

moriartythetease:

So what happens if two people who have promised their firstborn to separate witches have a child together? Do they both just pop up in the nursery and have a custody battle?

I need a book about a little girl whose parents had promised their firstborn to different witches and the only way that both ends of the deal were fulfilled was for them to have joint custody of the child.

I love it!

And then the witches, forced to share a cottage while raising their joint stolen child, fall in love…

6 hours ago with 4,670 notes — via pyromaniacqueen, © moriartythetease